Telstra pays $100k fine for privacy abuse

Powered by SC Magazine
 

External call centre guilty of Do Not Call register breach.

Australia's competition watchdog has found that Telstra-contracted call centres made unsolicited telemarketing calls to telephone numbers listed on the Do Not Call Register.

An Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) investigation, which commenced in August 2008, found that external call centres contracted by Telstra breached the Do Not Call Register Act 2006.

ACMA claims to have received numerous complaints from consumers despite having advised Telstra of potential compliance problems.

The investigation found that "inadequate compliance systems, procedures and supervision" all contributed to calls being made to numbers on the Do Not Call Register.

Telstra has paid $101,200 in fines.

"Telstra has paid the infringement notice, acknowledged that there is work to do, and is now setting about fixing these issues," said ACMA chairman, Chris Chapman.

"The ACMA expects large businesses like Telstra to be leading the way and setting an example when it comes to compliance with the Do Not Call Register - not falling behind," he added.

He also warned that "size and complexity" was no excuse for being non-compliant.

As well as having to pay $101,200 in fines, Telstra has been asked to engage with an external consultant to review Telstra's systems and procedures for compliance with the Do Not Call Register Act 2006.

The undertaking will last for three years. 

"The market leaders in the telco industry should consider themselves soundly on notice," the ACMA chairman warned.

To date, more than 3.5 million phone numbers have been entered into the Do Not Call Register.

ACMA has revealed evidence that the register has been a success. From May 2008 to May 2009 the ACMA received 12,057 complaints, a 60 percent drop on the prior twelve months.


Telstra pays $100k fine for privacy abuse
 
 
 
Top Stories
The True Cost of BYOD - 2014 survey
Twelve months on from our first study, is BYOD a better proposition?
 
Photos: Unboxing the Magnus supercomputer
Pawsey's biggest beast slots into place.
 
ANZ looks to life beyond the transaction
If digital disruptors think an online payments startup could rock the big four, they’ve missed the point of why people use banks, says Patrick Maes.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest articles on BIT Latest Articles from BIT
Pass on carbon tax savings, warns ACCC
Jul 24, 2014
The ACCC is warning businesses that supply "regulated goods" to pass on any cost savings ...
Have customers that won't pay debts?
Jul 10, 2014
The ACCC and ASIC have updated their advice when it comes to collecting debts.
Carpet cleaner faces court over online testimonials
Jul 4, 2014
The ACCC has initiated proceedings against A Whistle (1979) Pty Ltd, the franchisor of Electrodry...
You can now get 15GB of free online storage using Microsoft OneDrive
Jun 25, 2014
Cloud storage has reached both the capacity and price where it's a viable alternative to local ...
Another clever trick you can perform with Xero
Jun 25, 2014
Here is another way to reach out to particular subsets of your customers using Xero.
Latest Comments
Polls
What is delaying adoption of public cloud in your organisation?







   |   View results
Lock-in concerns
  29%
 
Application integration concerns
  3%
 
Security and compliance concerns
  28%
 
Unreliable network infrastructure
  9%
 
Data sovereignty concerns
  22%
 
Lack of stakeholder support
  3%
 
Protecting on-premise IT jobs
  4%
 
Difficulty transitioning CapEx budget into OpEx
  3%
TOTAL VOTES: 1079

Vote