Nintendo Brain Training 'good for kids'

 

Playing computer games can help school children to improve their mathematical abilities, according to the results of a pilot project at a school in Scotland..

The 10-week trial at St Columba's Primary in Dundee invited pupils to play Dr Kawashima's More Brain Training on a Nintendo DS for 15 to 20 minutes at the start of each school day.

A total of 30 children aged between nine and 10 were involved in the trial, which was devised by Derek Robertson, from Learning and Teaching Scotland.

Robertson claimed that he witnessed a "dramatic enhancement" in the mental maths ability of school children in "a short period of time".

The pilot had "pulled everybody up", according to Robertson, proving beneficial to the class as a whole and not just a select few.

Dr Kawashima's More Brain Training is a collection of puzzles that includes memory tests, reading exercises and problem solving challenges.

The combination of games aims to increase the flow of blood in the pre-frontal cortex, thereby positively exercising the brain.

According to Robertson the pilot also resulted in a dramatic improvement in the overall behaviour of the children that endured beyond the 10-week pilot.

"It seemed to have a settling effect," he said. "The results of this small-scale project have shown how the targeted and managed use of such a game can help to enhance pupil numeracy skills and classroom behaviour."

A spokesman for Dundee City Council said that the local authority is " exploring the possibility of extending the scheme".

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


 
 
 
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