Reporter admits using Wikipedia as source

 

Japanese hack claims information was 'common knowledge'.

A leading regional newspaper in Japan has apologised after using the user-compiled Wikipedia as a source for part of a front page story.

A senior reporter for the Shizuoka Shimbun used information from the Japanese edition of the online encyclopaedia in a story about former Japanese prime minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who died on 28 June. 

The journalist told how Miyazawa had once ordered former Soviet foreign minister Andrei Gomyko to sit down during heated negotiations over the disputed Kuril Islands in the 1970s.

Japanese bloggers and other internet users quickly noticed a strong similarity between the wording of the reporter's account and the page about Miyazawa on the Japanese edition of Wikipedia. 

The newspaper apologised to readers this morning for not revealing the source of the information, the Mainichi Daily News reported. A senior editorial executive described the reporter's actions as "inappropriate". 

The reporter claimed that he did not name the source because he believed the information to be common knowledge, the report said.

The Wikipedia page cites a newspaper in northern Japan as the source of its information. The original story actually appears to be anecdotal and has no named sources.

Wikipedia is one of the most popular websites on the internet, but it regularly faces criticism for inaccuracy.

Co-founder Larry Sanger, who left the project in 2002, described Wikipedia earlier this year as "broken beyond repair" and "frequently unreliable", although he conceded that it was "often quite useful". 

The Shizuoka Shimbun is a regional daily published in the Shizuoka area. It has an average daily circulation of around 750,000.



Copyright ©v3.co.uk


Reporter admits using Wikipedia as source
 
 
 
Top Stories
Qld Transport to replace core registration system
State's biggest citizen info repository set for overhaul.
 
Innovating in the sleepy super industry
There’s little incentive to be on the bleeding edge, so why is Andrew Todd fighting so hard?
 
How technology will unify Toll
The systems headache formed through 15 years of acquisitions.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  38%
 
Your insurance company
  3%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  7%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  8%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  2%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  21%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  15%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  5%
TOTAL VOTES: 850

Vote