Surplus of broadband routers harming the environment

 

ISP-locked routers promote waste.

Broadband routers locked to a specific ISP are creating an environmental problem, an ISP claimed today.

UK ISP Madasafish claims that the current practice by some ISPs of locking broadband routers to their networks is creating a mountain of useless equipment.

When an ISP locks a router to its network in order to deter customers from switching providers, it renders good hardware useless and this practice is hazardous to the environment, according to the ISP.

It added that the routers are made of hundreds of materials, some of which are very toxic. As network-locked routers are not able to be reused, recycled or upgraded, most are finding their way to landfill sites across the UK, creating a potentially hazardous situation.

"Most consumers are not aware that their broadband router has been locked by their [ISP]," said David Laurie, chief executive officer, Madasafish.

"The amount of routers that are becoming null and void due to locking is increasing at approximately 100,000 per month - this is of real environmental concern."

"If this trend continues the number of disused routers will exceed 2 million by the end of 2007 – put together this is enough to build a tower 75 times taller than Big Ben.

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


Surplus of broadband routers harming the environment
 
 
 
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