Novell bridges gap between .Net and Linux

 

Version 1.2 of Mono touted as interoperability 'milestone'.

Novell has unveiled the release version of its Mono application designed to bridge the gap between *nix and Microsoft's .Net development framework.

Mono 1.2 represents an important milestone towards compatibility with version 2.0 of the .Net framework, according to Novell.

Key enhancements include the addition of support for the Microsoft Windows Forms API to more easily port .Net client-side applications to Linux.

Other improvements include virtual machine upgrades and enhanced Java support, together with performance, memory consumption and stability enhancements.

Novell claimed that the application enables Microsoft developers to use existing skills to "effortlessly" make .Net desktop and server applications run on Linux.

"With full Mono support for the Windows Forms API developers can now bring their existing Microsoft-based client applications to Linux while significantly minimising the time and effort required to migrate these applications," Novell stated.

The firm added that the inclusion of Windows Forms capabilities in Mono 1.2 offers developers operating system alternatives for hosting existing .Net applications, in addition to opening up the possibility of new desktop applications on Linux.

"With this release, we have solved an important issue by making it easier to translate the Microsoft user interfaces to Linux, an important contribution in increasing the number of client-side Linux applications," said Miguel de Icaza, vice president of developer platforms at Novell and maintainer of the Mono project.

"Mono has matured to the point where we believe the migration from ASP .Net and Windows Forms to Linux is easier than ever before and gives developers access to all the added benefits of Linux."

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


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