Aussie bandwidth demand unchanged by SKA split

 

Terabit-per-second links floated.

The long-awaited decision late last week to split the Square Kilometre Array project between rival bidders South Africa and Australia has not dampened bandwidth requirements for the local project.

Although "the majority of SKA dishes" under phase one will be built in South Africa from 2016, Australian project director Brian Boyle said Australian IT requirements were largely unchanged from what its single-site proposal.

"The phase one deployment in Australia is pretty much close to the full phase one deployment that we had anticipated in terms of overall IT requirements," Boyle told iTnews.

"The dual-site model changes nothing in that regard. We're not correlating data in real-time with South Africa.

"It's very much getting the reduced data from Australia out to the rest of the world and we have planned for more than sufficient bandwidth in order to do that."

An analysis of the SKA dual-site solution given to organisers this month suggested 1.4 terabits per second of bandwidth would be needed for the Australian portion of the project at its peak.

Australia's ability to meet those needs was questioned during the bidding process, with organisers raising concerns over bandwidth costs and connectivity.

The years-long bidding war between Australia and South Africa was delayed in March when organisers of the $2 billion project could not reach a majority decision on one winner.

At the time, the SKA Site Advisory Committee said Australia had sufficient local fibre connectivity but the cost of additional active components - estimates in the hundreds of millions - left the country with a "medium to high level weakness" against South Africa.

Australian phase one array to generate petabits per second

The ultimate decision, handed down in the Netherlands on Friday, will see Australia expand the $100 million Australian SKA Pathfinder under construction in remote Western Australia to add low frequency and survey telescopes by 2020.

The frequency range is optimised for large-scale surveys and particularly for researching topics such as dark matter and dark energy, according to academics.

South Africa will build out its MeerKAT array to explore portions of space in the medium to higher frequencies, optimised for detecting weaker signals in space.

According to Boyle, New Zealand - a joint bidder with Australia - would not play a significant part in the project until phase two, scheduled for early next decade.

While Australia's responsibilities under the SKA are somewhat reduced compared to its bid, Boyle estimated the project would still gather some six petabits per second of data from local telescopes during phase one.

It would use $46 million worth of local and international fibre connectivity earmarked for use by the ASKAP project to operate the array in Western Australia, including a 40 Gbps connection between the telescopes and the Pawsey Centre.

It leveraged government-funded fibre links built under the $250 million Regional Broadband Blackspot Program to Geraldton in Western Australia, while using on international capacity leased by the Australian research network AARNet.

Much of the data generated by the telescopes will be processed on-site, as well as at the $80 million Pawsey Centre in Perth. Australian data would be stored locally but replicated globally.

Datasets gathered separately by the South African and Australian telescopes would only be collated on-demand by scientists that required both sets for specific experiments.

"You'd imagine there would be repositories around the world, including in South Africa and Australia themselves, where all the datasets would be brought together and you'd be allowed the chance to look at objects across a wide frequency range with data taken from both sites," Boyle said.

Up to 99 percent of the raw data generated under phase one of the SKA will ultimately be dumped as scientists seek to gain grip on the sheer amount of storage required for the project.

Boyle said the organisation would store "as much as we can afford to", with an effort to retaining as much raw and process data as possible.

"It's certainly petascale and it will be pushing the exascale in the size of the data," he said.

Copyright © iTnews.com.au . All rights reserved.


Aussie bandwidth demand unchanged by SKA split
 
 
 
Top Stories
Frugality as a service: the Amazon story
Behind the scenes, Amazon Web Services is one lean machine.
 
Negotiating with the cloud email megavendors
[Blog post] Lessons from Woolworths’ mammoth migration.
 
Qld govt to move up to 149k staff onto Office 365
Australia's largest deployment, outside of the universities.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...

Latest VideosSee all videos »

The great data centre opportunity on Australia's doorstep
The great data centre opportunity on Australia's doorstep
Scott Noteboom, CEO of LitBit speaking at The Australian Data Centre Strategy Summit 2014 in the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. http://bit.ly/1qpxVfV Scott Noteboom is a data centre engineer who led builds for Apple and Yahoo in the earliest days of the cloud, and who now eyes Asia as the next big opportunity. Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/372482,how-do-we-serve-three-billion-new-internet-users.aspx#ixzz2yNLmMG5C
Interview: Karl Maftoum, CIO, ACMA
Interview: Karl Maftoum, CIO, ACMA
To COTS or not to COTS? iTnews asks Karl Maftoum, CIO of the ACMA, at the CIO Strategy Summit.
Susan Sly: What is the Role of the CIO?
Susan Sly: What is the Role of the CIO?
AEMO chief information officer Susan Sly calls for more collaboration among Australia's technology leaders at the CIO Strategy Summit.
Meet the 2014 Finance CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Finance CIO of the Year
Credit Union Australia's David Gee awarded Finance CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards.
Meet the 2014 Retail CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Retail CIO of the Year
Damon Rees named Retail CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards for his work at Woolworths.
Robyn Elliott named the 2014 Utilities CIO of the Year
Robyn Elliott named the 2014 Utilities CIO of the Year
Acting Foxtel CIO David Marks accepts an iTnews Benchmark Award on behalf of Robyn Elliott.
Meet the 2014 Industrial CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Industrial CIO of the Year
Sanjay Mehta named Industrial CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards for his work at ConocoPhillips.
Meet the 2014 Healthcare CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Healthcare CIO of the Year
Greg Wells named Healthcare CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards for his work at NSW Health.
Meet the 2014 Education CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Education CIO of the Year
William Confalonieri named Healthcare CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards for his work at Deakin University.
Meet the 2014 Government CIO of the Year
Meet the 2014 Government CIO of the Year
David Johnson named Government CIO of the Year at the iTnews Benchmark Awards for his work at the Queensland Police Service.
Q and A: Coalition Broadband Policy
Q and A: Coalition Broadband Policy
Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott discuss the Coalition's broadband policy with the press.
AFP scalps hacker 'leader' inside Australia's IT ranks.
AFP scalps hacker 'leader' inside Australia's IT ranks.
The Australian Federal Police have arrested a Sydney-based IT security professional for hacking a government website.
NBN Petition Delivered To Turnbull's Office
NBN Petition Delivered To Turnbull's Office
UTS CIO: IT teams of the future
UTS CIO: IT teams of the future
UTS CIO Chrissy Burns talks data.
New UTS Building: the IT within
New UTS Building: the IT within
The IT behind tomorrow's universities.
iTnews' NBN Panel
iTnews' NBN Panel
Is your enterprise NBN-ready?
Introducing iTnews Labs
Introducing iTnews Labs
See a timelapse of the iTnews labs being unboxed, set up and switched on! iTnews will produce independent testing of the latest enterprise software to hit the market after installing a purpose-built test lab in Sydney. Watch the installation of two DL380p servers, two HP StoreVirtual 4330 storage arrays and two HP ProCurve 2920 switches.
The True Cost of BYOD
The True Cost of BYOD
iTnews' Brett Winterford gives attendees of the first 'Touch Tomorrow' event in Brisbane a brief look at his research into enterprise mobility. What are the use cases and how can they be quantified? What price should you expect to pay for securing mobile access to corporate applications? What's coming around the corner?
Ghost clouds
Ghost clouds
ACMA chair Chris Chapman says there is uncertainty over whether certain classes of cloud service providers are caught by regulations.
Was the Snowden leak inevitable?
Was the Snowden leak inevitable?
Privacy experts David Vaile (UNSW Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre) and Craig Scroggie (CEO, NextDC) claim they were not surprised by the Snowden leaks about the NSA's PRISM program.
Latest Comments
Polls
Which bank is most likely to suffer an RBS-style meltdown?





   |   View results
ANZ
  21%
 
Bankwest
  9%
 
CommBank
  11%
 
National Australia Bank
  17%
 
Suncorp
  24%
 
Westpac
  19%
TOTAL VOTES: 1451

Vote