Operation Titstorm hits the streets

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Protest planned in major Australian cities.

Operation Titstorm will hit the streets of Australian cities in a "peaceful protest" against mandatory internet censorship this Saturday.

Dubbed 'Project Freeweb', the protest is organised by members of hacker group Anonymous, which took credit for last week's prolonged DDoS attack on Australian Government websites.

Events are planned in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Newcastle and Canberra at various times on 20 February. More than ten members of Anonymous are expected to attend each event.

However, organisers expect that a majority of the protest will take place overseas. Anonymous members have been urged to lead protests at Australian embassies around the world.

"We wish to oppose this filter because we're not only representing Australia, but the world," a Project Freeweb organiser who goes by the alias 'Infinite' told iTnews.

"If passed, this legislation will set a disturbing precedent at an international level.

"The public, not the Government, should have the right to decide what is deemed appropriate for you or your family to be exposed to."

'Infinite' hoped that Project Freeweb would have more of a 'long term' effect on public perception of the filter than Operation Titstorm, which was criticised for harming more moderate efforts to campaign against internet censorship.

"Many of our number are productive, intelligent members of society," said Infinite, who is a Web designer.

"Some of the members of Anonymous, while feeling that the motivations behind Operation Titstorm were understandable and to a certain extent warranted, also felt that it cast a bad light upon the group as a whole."

Protesters have been instructed to study background information on Senator Conroy's filter plans and ACMA, and have been told not to wear masks.

While Anonymous members may be risking their post-Titstorm anonymity by appearing at the protests, 'Infinite' said that being involved in one event did not necessarily mean the individual was involved in the other.

Those involved in the DDoS attacks had taken precautions to ensure their anonymity, and many were not residents of Australia, he said.

To critics of Operation Titstorm, he said: "Anonymous understands their frustration, yet they fail to comprehend that one of the most important creations in the history of mankind is about to fall into the control of the government. And that must not happen.

"The internet must be protected at all costs. This is more than an opposition to the censorship of porn, this is the protection of our rights as human beings ... to have control over what we should be allowed to view and not have to fear a draconian censor."


Operation Titstorm hits the streets
 
 
 
Top Stories
NBN to offer TV connections through fibre for greenfields
Ditching aerials to come at a cost.
 
Tech SWAT teams kicking down the digital door
From dam engineers in Ecuador to Sydney light-rail gurus, Cardno's global CIO Karen Wagner is linking up her widespread organisation.
 
AusPost board approves Fujitsu outsourcing
End user computing to be handed over to partner.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest articles on BIT Latest Articles from BIT
Xerocon is heading to Melbourne!
Jul 1, 2015
We're not saying Xero is our FAVOURITE or anything, but Xero's 2015 Xerocon conference is being ...
New Microsoft Office apps for Android phones
Jun 26, 2015
Microsoft's latest Office apps for Android now work on phones as well as tablets, further ...
Windows 10 UK price revealed, but don't believe everything you hear
Jun 26, 2015
Windows 10 £99 price tag for users in the UK (who presumably don't already have Win 7 Pro ...
Now Xero notifies iOS users of new transactions
Jun 24, 2015
The latest version of Xero's iPhone app includes notifications when new transactions arrive from ...
Your Essential Cloud Toolbox
Jun 22, 2015
When BIT interviewed Receipt Bank country manager Sophie Hossack, we asked for her thoughts on ...
Latest Comments
Polls
Is site blocking effective in stopping piracy?


   |   View results
Yes
  2%
 
No
  85%
 
Somewhat
  13%
TOTAL VOTES: 655

Vote