Adobe fixes Flash and Photoshop flaws

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Publicly available exploit code leaves millions at risk.

Adobe has released updates that patch security holes in two of the company's most popular products. 

The patches fix three vulnerabilities in the free Flash player plug-in and two in Photoshop. Publicly available exploit code for the flaws has been found on the web.

The two Photoshop vulnerabilities were first disclosed in late April by a security researcher known as 'Marsu'.

The disclosures include code for exploits which could allow an attacker to successfully execute malicious code on a target system via a specially crafted 'bmp', 'dib' or 'rle' document file.

Secunia rated both vulnerabilities as 'highly critical', the firm's second highest threat classification. The flaws affect versions CS2 and CS3 of Photoshop, and one of the flaws also affects Photoshop Elements 5.0. 

The set of three patches for the Flash player browser plug-in were also rated by Secunia as 'highly critical'. The patch affects versions 7, 8 and 9 of the player.

The most severe of the vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to remotely execute code on a target system, while another flaw could allow an attacker to access sensitive user information.

If left unpatched, the Flash player vulnerabilities could put millions of users worldwide at risk.

Adobe estimated earlier this year that 98.7 percent of internet users worldwide had some version of the plug-in.

Both patches are available from Adobe's Security Bulletins and Advisories website.

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


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