HP claims its photo paper lasts 80 years

 

HP has criticised the quality of third-party inkjet printer inks and papers, saying that they cannot match the quality or longevity of its own products.

HP has criticised the quality of third-party inkjet printer inks and papers, saying that they cannot match the quality or longevity of its own products.

Quoting research carried out by the independent Wilhelm Imaging Research centre, an HP representative said its papers were expected to last at least 80 years, while third-party papers might only last three years before needing replacement.

According to the research, new papers from HP also dry faster and can be handled as soon as they come out of the printer without damaging the image.

This is achieved by using porous paper that absorbs the ink very quickly. Older photo paper used swellable paper, which could take an hour before safe handling and up to a day before the ink was completely dry.

Although the main component of inkjet ink is water, there are also many chemicals included. Some of these stop the paper from curling while the ink is still wet, while others prevent wear and tear to the inkjet heads themselves.

Likewise, there are many different layers in inkjet paper that are designed to protect the ink, as well as give a glossy finish.

Copyright © 2010 Computer Active


HP claims its photo paper lasts 80 years
 
 
 
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