iOS 7 jailbreak sparks controversy

 

Default Chinese app store offers pirated software.

A newly-released jailbreak that opens up Apple's iOS 7 mobile operating system from system restrictions has been forced to backtrack on its decision to partner with an app store that offers pirated software.

The 'evad3rs' team of developers had been working on the 'evasi0n' jailbreak for iOS 7 since Apple released the latest version of its mobile operating system in September this year. Yesterday, the developers announced the availability of evasi0n7, which can be applied via USB cable through either Windows or Apple OS X PCs.

Jailbreaking is a way of escalating user privileges on iOS, giving full access to the hardware and software on the device, often through the use of bugs and security holes in the operating system.

Apple restricts iOS privileges for security reasons, locking users out of direct access to the file system and allowing only its own App Store to be accessed.

Some of the features enabled by the evasi0n7 jailbreak include use of popular alternative app stores such as Cydia, customisation of the user interface, and being able to get around device tethering restrictions with certain telcos.

Backtrack on Taig

The evad3ers initially opted to enter a contractual relationship with controversial Chinese app store Taig - rather than the popular Cydia - for its default app store for Chinese users, but was later forced to backtrack after finding it contained pirated software.

Taig's app store had been rumoured to contain pirated software, but the company denied it supports piracy and said it removes infringing software.

One day after release of the new jailbreak, one of the team's developers said pirated apps had been discovered and Taig would therefore be removed as the default for Chinese users.

Copyright © iTnews.com.au . All rights reserved.


iOS 7 jailbreak sparks controversy
 
 
 
Top Stories
ANZ looks to life beyond the transaction
If digital disruptors think an online payments startup could rock the big four, they’ve missed the point of why people use banks, says Patrick Maes.
 
What InfoSec can learn from the insurance industry
[Blog post] Another way data breach laws could help manage risk.
 
A ten-point plan for disrupting security
[Blog post] How can you defend the perimeter when it’s in the cloud?
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
What is delaying adoption of public cloud in your organisation?







   |   View results
Lock-in concerns
  29%
 
Application integration concerns
  3%
 
Security and compliance concerns
  27%
 
Unreliable network infrastructure
  9%
 
Data sovereignty concerns
  21%
 
Lack of stakeholder support
  3%
 
Protecting on-premise IT jobs
  4%
 
Difficulty transitioning CapEx budget into OpEx
  3%
TOTAL VOTES: 1041

Vote