FBI arrests hacker with possible Anonymous links

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Brute force attack caused $10,000 in damages, officials say.

The Fbi has arrested a 27 year old US man with alleged ties to the Anonymous collective after a near two-year investigation.

Fidel Salinas Jr. was charged with accessing a protected computer without authorisation and recklessly causing damage and faces a prison sentence of one to five years.

The US Government website attack compromised sensitive human resources and emergency alert data, caused slowness and latency for users, and left administrators unable to access or manage the website for most of the day, according to an affidavit.

Access to the website was the result of a brute force SQL injection attack that official said caused more than $10,000 in damages.

The FBI said he made 14,000 attempts to hack into the website, particularly the administration page, according to the affidavit.

The internet protocol address linked the attacks to a Texas address belonging to the man's partner.

Salinas Jr said he intended to alert the site's network administrators.

But the FBI recovered from Salinas' computer hacking tools and an internet relay chat containing logs pertaining to the revived AntiSec movement, now affiliated with the Anonymous collective.

Salinas said he used SQL injection techniques to access the website and had chatted with members of Anonymous.

This article originally appeared at scmagazineus.com

Copyright © SC Magazine, US edition


FBI arrests hacker with possible Anonymous links
 
 
 
Top Stories
There's no coke and hookers in the cloud
[Blog post] Where did the love go?
 
The True Cost of BYOD - 2014 survey
Twelve months on from our first study, is BYOD a better proposition?
 
Five zero-cost ways to improve MySQL performance
How to easily boost MySQL throughput by up to 5x.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Which is the most prevalent cyber attack method your organisation faces?




   |   View results
Phishing and social engineering
  68%
 
Advanced persistent threats
  3%
 
Unpatched or unsupported software vulnerabilities
  11%
 
Denial of service attacks
  6%
 
Insider threats
  12%
TOTAL VOTES: 1029

Vote