Apple patents password-managing power adaptor

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Device to enable password recovery.

Apple has patented a power adapter and processor designed to store passwords.

According to a US patent (20120005747) filed by Apple, the device contains a memory unit that serves as a password manager.

When users forget passwords, the computer would use an identifier to obtain an encrypted recovery secret stored on the adaptor.

 

The recovery secret could be generated by encrypting a password using the universal unique identifier (UUID).

The decryption process could be tied to a specific device, a server, or peripherals such as printers and routers. Apple says this would increase security in the event that adaptors were stolen.

In its patent, Apple said the unit would help reduce the need for password resets and encourage users to choose stronger passwords.

However free software password managers have been available for years, and are interoperable across many mobile platforms and operating systems.

The managers help users set passwords with high entropy, stored in a database and made accessible using a master password.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


Apple patents password-managing power adaptor
Flickr
 
 
 
Top Stories
Beyond ACORN: Cracking the infosec skills nut
[Blog post] Could the Government's cybercrime focus be a catalyst for change?
 
The iTnews Benchmark Awards
Meet the best of the best.
 
Telstra hands over copper, HFC in new $11bn NBN deal
Value of 2011 deal remains intact.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  39%
 
Your insurance company
  3%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  8%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  7%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  2%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  20%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  14%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  6%
TOTAL VOTES: 1786

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?