NATO server hacked, files published

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Hackers claim private zero day.

A NATO server appears to have been hacked by a group that claims to have rooted the server with a private zero day exploit.

A private zero day exploit is a vulnerability discovered in a system that is not disclosed publicly before being used in an attack.

A 50 MB backup of 2646 files from what reportedly was NATO's Apache Tomcat servlet was posted on a cyberlocker to prove the attack.

Online group Team Inj3ct0r claimed responsibility for the attack under the auspices of the AntiSec hacking movement and said it was made in response to alleged "nuclear weapons its development (sic) and financing".

In a text file note left on the server, the group said:

"NATO lamers! I've been watching you day and night since then! W00t! Your Machines rooted! Servers restored to default! what else! F**k you and your crimes! and soon enough all your stupid ideas will be published on WikiLeaks!
Greetz.. I stand alone :)"

The attack is the second to hit NATO in as many months, following an attack on a third party NATO bookshop in June

The threat of hacking and activist groups has not gone unnoticed by NATO. In a report last month NATO General Rapporteur Lord Jopling said:

"Observers note that Anonymous is becoming more and more sophisticated and could potentially hack into sensitive government, military, and corporate files. ...even if one is in favour of transparency, military and intelligence operations simply cannot be planned and consulted with the public. Transparency cannot exist without control. The government, and especially its security agencies, must have the right to limit access to information in order to govern and to protect."


Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


NATO server hacked, files published
 
 
 
Top Stories
 
 
IAG hands digital chief his own ‘Labs’ division
Enterprise ops chief squeezed out in restructure.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Should law enforcement be able to buy and use exploits?



   |   View results
Yes
  14%
 
No
  51%
 
Only in special circumstances
  17%
 
Yes, but with more transparency
  18%
TOTAL VOTES: 825

Vote