Aussie charged over malicious code injections

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Virus targeted bank details and credit card numbers.

A 20-year-old Adelaide man has been charged with compromising 3000 computers with malicious code to capture internet banking and credit card details.

The man, from the city's western suburbs, was arrested after a "highly technical" three-month investigation involving both South Australian and Federal Police, as well as the Australian Communications and Media Authority.

It was also suspected the man "had developed capabilities to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks with up to 74000 computers worldwide", police said in a statement.

"The arrest has resulted in the acquisition of intelligence which can be utilised to identify further offenders," SA Police said.

"Detectives from [the] Electronic Crime Section and AFP High Tech Crime Operations will continue investigations into offending emanating from South Australia and disrupt criminal activity of this nature."

The man was charged with unauthorised modification of computer data, supply and possession of a computer virus with intent to commit a serious computer offence, unlawful operation of a computer system, theft, and trafficking a controlled substance.

He was bailed to appear in the Adelaide Magistrates Court on 4 September and faces between two and ten years in prison if found guilty.


Aussie charged over malicious code injections
 
 
 
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