Aussie firm sells Twitter followers

 

Buy users in several packages.

Australian media marketing firm uSocial is offering a new paid service allowing organisations to buy Twitter followers to aid their marketing campaigns.

According to the firm, a single Twitter follower could be worth $0.10 a month. It is selling followers in various packages, starting at 1,000 for $87, which is delivered in seven days, and going all the way up to 100,000 followers at a cost of $3,479, delivered over a year.

USocial says it profiles Twitter users to ensure a good fit with their clients, then suggests they follow the Twitter feed of that client – the user then decides whether to follow or not.

"The simple fact is, Twitter followers are worth money to you and your business," reads a statement on the uSocial site. "The more followers you have, the more money you will inevitably make marketing your products and services to them. While all followers won't be responsive customers, many will."

The firm also offers businesses a Twitter marketing service, whereby a monthly fee will ensure your business's products or services are pushed out through uSocial's 18,000 followers via the micro-blogging site.

According to online tracking company comScore, Twitter had 32 million users globally as of April 2009.

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Aussie firm sells Twitter followers
 
 
 
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