Passive RFID users granted four-watt reprieve

 

Ultra high frequency (UHF) RFID devices up to four watts have been approved for use by the Australian Communications and Media Authority following four years of successful tests.

The local administrator of the EPCglobal RFID standard, GS1 Australia, said that ACMA’s decision to approve the use of four watt devices between the 920 and 926 MHz band would remove barriers to adoption of the technology locally.

Previously, UHF RFID services in Australia came under a low interference potential devices (LIPD) class license that limited the use of RFID power to one watt between the 918 to 926 MHz band.

This put Australia behind standards and regulations for passive UHF RFID systems internationally, according to GS1.

ACMA issued a scientific license to GS1 three years ago that enabled the administrator ‘to issue third-party authorisations for the use of site-specific four watt power to companies trialling or looking to implement RFID’, GS1 said.

“The purpose of the scientific license was to gather data to assist ACMA to determine if an increase in power had any major effect on devices of adjacent users in that spectrum,” the administrator said.

“Reports on these trials and the results of scientific testing were submitted to the ACMA by GS1 Australia in 2007 and 2008.

“ACMA’s decision is a significant milestone in the journey of EPC/RFID use within Australia,” it said.

Passive RFID users granted four-watt reprieve
 
 
 
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