AFP and Telstra to fight hi-tech crime

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The Australian Federal Police (AFP) and Telstra will increase cooperative efforts to reduce hi-tech crimes like identity fraud, phishing, botnet networks and attacks on public and private sector computer networks.

The joint cooperation agreement, signed in Canberra today, also covers professional development of Telstra and AFP staff and employee secondment arrangements.

It will assist the AFP in gaining a better understanding of the evolution of the telecommunications environment, according to AFP acting deputy commissioner, Andrew Colvin.

Both organisations will focus immediate attention on identity fraud and internet-enabled crime such as phishing; online paedophile activity; child protection and education; botnet networks and organised crime syndicates; online terrorism activities; and targeted attacks on public, government and private sector computer networks.

“Technology-enabled crime is a complex, dynamic environment with new trends constantly emerging,” said Colvin.

“We must continually look at improving our methods of detection and prevention.

“One of the most valuable ways to do this is for law enforcement agencies and governments to work with the private sector to establish effective procedures to counter technology-enabled crime.

”Secure communications networks, platforms and systems are critical to both national security and the business environment, highlighting the need for vigilance. This is fundamental to Australia’s security,” said Colvin.

AFP and Telstra to fight hi-tech crime
 
 
 
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