Cisco takes service routers to the edge

 

Aggregation Services Router 1000 unveiled at CeBIT.

Cisco has unveiled its Aggregation Services Router 1000 at the CeBIT show in Hanover designed for service provider and enterprise edge network deployment.

The networking firm said that the new router is purpose-built for edge networks and took over five years to develop at a cost of US$250 million.

The ASR 1000 Series is driven by the new QuantumFlow processor, an integrated and programmable router and service engine, and features software virtualisation to enable instant-on provisioning and simultaneous use of a wide range of service functionality.

These services include firewall, IPSec virtual private networks, deep-packet inspection and Session Border Control.

Cisco believes that embedding these features into a single appliance makes it easier to deploy and manage, as well as saving on capital costs and operations expenses.

"Next-generation networks will enable a broad range of services in a wide variety of combinations, many requiring high-quality, high-definition, bidirectional communication to meet customer demands," said Shin Hashomoto, executive vice president at NTT.

"In contrast to conventional best-effort approaches, we believe it will be necessary for the edge of network to perform dynamic quality control to flexibly and securely enable aggregation of traffic from broadband services and converged communications."

The Cisco ASR 1000 combines all the necessary service features into a single router platform, resulting in a substantial increase in IP forwarding performance, according to the networking giant.

The device can also simplify network design because a single router can be used in different hardware deployments and provide different services based on installed software.

The Cisco ASR 1000 series will be generally available in April 2008 in two, four and six rack unit sizes. Pricing starts at US$35,000.

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


 
 
 
Top Stories
Content, cost & constant innovation: How Foxtel plans to take on Netflix
Nell Payne inhabits the “brave new world of blue strings and networking”. Just don't ask her to put a TV screen on your microwave.
 
Sending in the drones
Margins are getting tighter in the industrial services industry, so Transfield Services' Stephen Phillips looks offshore - and to the skies - for the solutions he needs to keep pace.
 
Westpac fires starting pistol on core banking upgrade
St George readies itself for move to Celeriti.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Should Optus make a bid for iiNet?

   |   View results
Yes
  43%
 
No
  57%
TOTAL VOTES: 527

Vote