UK's NHS loses 6,000 smartcards

Powered by SC Magazine
 

The NHS has misplaced as many as 6,000 smartcards used to access patient records..

The organisation claimed that there is no cause for concern since the cards are useless without a Pin. But the case has highlighted poor data practice yet again by a government department.

"The worrying thing about this, and the many other high-profile breaches, is that the best practice processes and procedures needed to avoid these are laid out in government guidelines (for example ISO 27001)," said Mike Small, director of security strategy at CA.

"Perhaps there is a need for a combination of incentives and penalties to be implemented to make sure that these best practices are actually followed."

However, some observers maintain that fears of data loss are being exaggerated, and that the need for data to be accessed by all outweighs any problems with access.

"In the kind of environment where this system is being used, it is vital that the right people are able to access the necessary information as quickly and accurately as possible. It could even be a matter of life and death," said Paul Malcolm, UK general manager at Sentillion, which works with NHS Trusts on some IT projects.

"Having a simple physical device such as a smartcard enables this. Of course it is also important to make sure that all this private information is only available to the correct people, and this is why the second factor of authentication is so critical."

Copyright ©v3.co.uk


 
 
 
Top Stories
Keeping the peace
It takes a thick skin to mediate between the IT and digital camps.
 
The True Cost of BYOD - 2014 survey
Twelve months on from our first study, is BYOD a better proposition?
 
Five zero-cost ways to improve MySQL performance
How to easily boost MySQL throughput by up to 5x.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Which is the most prevalent cyber attack method your organisation faces?




   |   View results
Phishing and social engineering
  68%
 
Advanced persistent threats
  3%
 
Unpatched or unsupported software vulnerabilities
  11%
 
Denial of service attacks
  6%
 
Insider threats
  12%
TOTAL VOTES: 1047

Vote