Online job applications raise fears of identity theft

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People who send their CVs to online job sites may be putting themselves at risk of identity theft according to a fraud prevention experiment.

People who send their CVs to online job sites may be putting themselves at risk of identity theft according to a fraud prevention experiment.

A firm called Iprofile, backed by the UK police and the Information Assurance Advisory Council (IAAC) set up the experiment as part of a recent national identity fraud prevention week.

A fake job hunting website called Denis Atlas was set up and an ad sent out to a national newspaper, inviting people interested in a job as an office manager to send their CVs in online.

107 people fell into the trap, submitting CVs laden with personal data without giving it a second thought. Apparently, 61 of the CVs even held enough personal information to allow identity thieves to apply for a credit card.

Neil Fisher from IAAC told the Beeb, "Many people are happy to send their CVs "blind" without thinking about the consequences if their information fell into the wrong hands".

Most people gave their full address and date of birth out freely, but some even went as far as including their National Insurance and passport numbers.

The Metropolitan Police and Iprofile have advised that people be much more careful who they send personal information to online and recommended that people applying for jobs on the Interwibble avoid giving out their birth date, marital status, and place of birth.

Because it’s not only job hunters who believe in the phrase “seek and you will find”. µ

L'Inq

BBC
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