New web attack immediately siphons stolen data

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New web attack immediately siphons stolen data

New attack steals data from any site.

Researchers have detected a "new man-in-the-browser" (MITB) attack method that uses malware capable of stealing users bank or other sensitive information entered on websites.

As opposed to traditional MITB scams – where locally-installed malware activates when users visit predefined websites – this technique allows criminals to draw victims' data from an unlimited pool of sites.

Trusteer discovered the threat in late August and posted a blog this week that details the scam.

Senior security strategist George Tubin told SC that malware used in "universal" MITB attacks processed information like credit card numbers immediately, rather than afterward, as in a traditional MITB scenario.

When using this new attack method, fraudsters don't have to parse through huge amounts of data or text collected over time, which leaves victims less opportunity to change their credit card details, passwords or other captured information.

“It doesn't matter what websites [victims] go to, it only matters if they use their credit card,” Tubin said.

“The likelihood of success is significantly higher using this type of technique versus the traditional man-in-the-browser. When they get the card information, it's going to be fresher information.”

Trusteer spotted a video used by cyber criminals to market the uncommon and still emerging attack method.

Zeus and SpyEye were examples of crimeware kits used in the universal MITB attacks. The malware often is loaded onto victims' machines through common phishing tactics or by taking advantage of unpatched browser vulnerabilities in drive-by download attacks.

“Browser security has never been done properly,” Tom Kellermann, vice president of cyber security at anti-virus firm Trend Micro told SC. “[Attackers] are creating modules that fully automate the MITB process you used to have to do manually.”

In June, Trend Micro researchers released a report on a new technique, called an “automatic transfer system” (ATS), being used to commit financial fraud. This also was used to launch MITB attacks and to instantly intercept users' login details, while going undetected by victims.

This article originally appeared at scmagazineus.com

Copyright © SC Magazine, US edition
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