MatrixCNI notches up good first year

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Fifteen-month-old Sydney integrator MatrixCNI has netted $5 million in revenue for its first year and expects to increase sales 50 percent on the back of an increased push into corporate and remote access networking in the next.

Fifteen-month-old Sydney integrator MatrixCNI has netted $5 million in revenue for its first year and expects to increase sales 50 percent on the back of an increased push into corporate and remote access networking in the next.

Deni Saupin, MD at MatrixCNI, said the young company had just taken on its seventh full time staff member.

“We also have three people working with us on a casual basis. This time next year, we will have grown by about 25 percent,” he said.

MatrixCNI has a strong focus on government deals. However, Saupin is betting on corporate work and remote access networking as strong revenue leaders for the coming year.

“We're starting to make forays in non-government. And, funnily enough, the benefits they gain are very much the same as in government,” he said.

More wireless opportunities were expected and MatrixCNI wanted a piece of that pie. “And remote access is going to be a bigger thing and we'll be doing more of that,” Saupin said.

Products such as SSL VPN were proving popular with government and non-government clients, partly because of their ability to enable remote access, he said.

MatrixCNI managed to get on a government panel, for contract 2069, as a network solution provider.

“That was very important for us. It allows us to participate in the market place where if you have got the status, it's very important,” he said. “That was difficult to get as a new player, but I think we showed that we had the processes and the expertise.”

The company had also got some “great vendor relationships” in place, citing secure remote access specialist F5 Networks and HP as two that had been particularly helpful for the young integrator.

However, Saupin had no plans to add vendors. An integrator needed enough vendors to offer what customers wanted but not too many, he said.

“We don't want to crowd our thinking. We don't want to crowd our clients. Though we certainly will always keep on looking. At the end of the day, we're just a middle man for the end-users,” Saupin said.

 

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