KAZ buys Intology IP, customers

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Telstra subsidiary KAZ has bought the intellectual property and customer contracts of Canberra-based business intelligence provider Intology for an undisclosed sum.

Telstra subsidiary KAZ has bought the intellectual property and customer contracts of Canberra-based business intelligence provider Intology for an undisclosed sum.

Michael Blake, ACT general manager at KAZ, said Intology platforms enabled fast delivery of precise information, making them a valuable addition to KAZ’s portfolio.

"For KAZ, the Intology platform is a best-of-breed toolset that strengthens the scope of services we offer to government and enterprises," he said.

Opportunities existed for integrating Intology business intelligence applications into various offerings, Blake said.

Ralph Meyen, managing director at Intology, founded the Canberra company in 1996.

"We have considered several potential partnerships over the years. However, from working with KAZ on a number of projects we realise KAZ’s team has the capacity to [harness] the potential of the Intology platform," Meyen said.

Business intelligence platforms could be a "logical solution" for companies operating in complex or highly regulated environments, Meyen said.

Intology provided information management products and services to large organisations that needed to synthesise information locked in technical terms, complex documents or individual business units, KAZ said in a statement.

The company’s customers included Defence, intelligence organisations and several of Australia’s largest corporations, KAZ said.

"The acquisition gives KAZ a powerful toolset to integrate into solutions for customers seeking to extract greater value from their corporate data," it said.

It is understood that the companies previously had a sub-contracting relationship.

KAZ said Intology had "self-learning" applications that categorised and established the meaning of structured and unstructured data. They could create metadata, taxonomies, glossaries, thesauri and other text functions and could scan texts and summarise documents.

"This includes through flexible processes of extracting keywords, summaries, names of people, organisations, dates and acronyms from documents, as well as identifying relationships between documents and their contents," the company said.

"This is backed by interfaces that, through search engine technologies for desktops, intranets and the web, provide links to related content."
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