Intel drives forward Moore's Law

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Intel has created fully functional 70Mb static random access memory (SRAM) chips with more than half a billion transistors using advanced nm process technology.

Intel has created fully functional 70Mb static random access memory (SRAM) chips with more than half a billion transistors using advanced nm process technology.

The development signifies the company's commitment to producing new manufacturing process technology every two years, in accordance with Moore's Law.

The transistors in the new 65nm technology incorporate gates measuring 35nm: so small that 100 could fit inside the diameter of a human red blood cell. In addition, the technology includes several innovative performance enhancing and power-saving features that will provide a basis for future thinking.

The achievement gives Intel a firm foundation from which to develop multi-core processors and design unique features, such as virtualisation and security safeguards.

'Intel continues to meet the increasing challenges of scaling by innovating with new materials, processes and device structures,' said Sunlin Chou, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's Technology and Manufacturing Group.

'Intel's 65nm process technology has industry-leading density, performance and power reduction features that will enable future chips with increased capabilities and performance.

'Intel's 65nm technology is on track for delivery in 2005 to extend the benefits of Moore's Law,' said Chou.

According to Moore's Law, the number of transistors on a chip roughly doubles every two years, increasing performance and decreasing costs; factors essential to the future of computing and communications.

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