Driver health checks go digital in NSW

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Driver health checks go digital in NSW

Taking paper out of the equation.

The NSW government will remove an inefficient, paper-based process used by truck drivers, the elderly and people with medical conditions to annually renew their driver’s licence with an integrated, electronic model.

Currently, heavy vehicle licence holders, drivers aged 75 and over, and people who suffer from illnesses that could affect them behind the wheel like epilepsy, sleeping disorders and diabetes have to visit a doctor once a year to certify that they are physically able to continue driving safely.

Motorists must then transmit the doctor’s certificate by mail or in person to their local motor registry to have their licence renewed.

In an effort to eliminate this frustrating process, the Roads and Maritime Service has signed with e-health firm HealthLink to set up an electronic form that will integrate with a GP’s practice software to submit the assessment electronically and immediately to the RMS licence review unit.

“This digital service developed by HealthLink means the 400,000 people who go through this process each year can now cross the visit into a registry or service centre off their to-do-list," Transport Minister Duncan Gay said in a statement.

“The communication from doctor to the assessors will also be instant, which means cases will be reviewed faster."

The RMS has spent $1.2 million with HealthLink to get the electronic forms up and running.

The HealthLink forms can automatically integrate with practice systems, or for GPs who don’t have software installed to run their office, through HealthLink’s online portal.

The electronic submissions are due to launch in the middle of the year.

The state government is also pushing ahead with a plan to fully digitise all drivers licences by the end of 2018.

It has already started eliminating hard copy cards in the case of fishing licences and certification for serving alcohol and working around gambling.

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