DotMobi opens up one and two character domains

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DotMobi opens up one and two character domains

The organisation behind the .mobi top-level domain (TLD) is to allow domains of just one or two alphanumeric characters.

DotMobi said that the move will allow people to create domains such as q.mobi, k9.mobi, 13.mobi or ny.mobi.

Although only a handful of TLDs allow domains of fewer than three characters, those that do find the properties in high demand. DotMobi cited the example of 88.com, which sold for around US$325,000 in a recent auction.

DotMobi believes that short domains will be even more highly prized in the mobile space because of the difficulty in typing long domains on a mobile keypad.

The organisation foresees interest from a variety of sectors, including universities, which could use their acronyms to help students find school-related mobile content, US states, which could use their two-digit code to promote tourism, and companies that could use stock ticker symbols as domains to track stock prices.

"One- and two-character domains are the most valuable and often most expensive domains when available," said Trey Harvin, chief executive at dotMobi.

"Rather than selling these names, dotMobi is looking to provide them to strong brands with high-quality mobile content. These short domains are highly memorable ways to reach mobile customers who are using the mobile web in 2009 as never before."

Unlike the traditional sale of domains by a registrar, companies interested in getting one of these short mobile domain names will need to submit a request for a particular expression, and provide specific concepts about how they intend to develop the domain.

All formal applicants will then be required to complete a proposal and contract process.

Although specifically focused domains such as .mobi and .tel are unlikely to be adversely affected, some concerns have been raised over proposals to allow the creation of generic top-level domains, which would essentially allow any organisation with sufficient resources to create their own TLD.
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