ACMA hands ShadowServer spam intel database

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ACMA hands ShadowServer spam intel database
Credit: Cookipedia

Researchers move into spam fighting.

Organisations could be set to get better intelligence on spam and phishing campaigns targeting their customers after the government communications watchdog provided ShadowServer access to its Spam Intelligence Database.

The Australian Communications and Media Authority's database contained contextual information on spam from the deluge of malicious emails the agency receives each day.

The database source code provided to ShadowServer's network of security researchers would help them identify and inform companies targeted in spam emails and analyse how the attacks were conducted.

A ShadowServer volunteer from the Australian chapter said the respected non-profit organisation did not to date analyse the vast amount of spam it received daily.

"It will allow us to more easily share data with the community," he said.

"The ACMA system knows how pull apart spam and that will allow us to alert brands."

ShadowServer analysed and disrupted online attack campaigns under a non-invasive policy. It was formed as an independent source of intelligence to law enforcement and the white-hat security community, specifically aiming to shore-up botnet investigative and control techniques and improve malware analysis.

It provided the ACMA with intelligence on attacks and malware campaigns which in turn passed the information to internet providers and universities.

It has yet to determine how it would use the open source spam database. The ACMA provided the platform to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the Netherlands telco watchdog (Onafhankelijke Post en Telecommunicatie Autoriteit) and New Zealand's Department of Internal Affairs.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia

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