Review: Wi-Foo: The Secrets of Wireless Hacking

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Review: Wi-Foo: The Secrets of Wireless Hacking

Despite the names (Konstantin Gavrilenko, Andrei Mikhailovsky, Andrew Vladimirov), the three people who wrote this book are based in the UK and are the founders of an IT security company there by the name of Arhout. They have decided to impart gems of knowledge to us about wireless networks and how to kept hackers out. Or alternatively if you possess a degree of moral flexibility, you could use this book to learn about hacking into said networks.

Despite the names (Konstantin Gavrilenko, Andrei Mikhailovsky, Andrew Vladimirov), the three people who wrote this book are based in the UK and are the founders of an IT security company there by the name of Arhout. They have decided to impart gems of knowledge to us about wireless networks and how to kept hackers out. Or alternatively if you possess a degree of moral flexibility, you could use this book to learn about hacking into said networks.

These wireless networks are all the rage nowadays and they are so easy to set up virtually anyone can do so. And that's where the trouble begins. Because they are so easy to get going very few people take the time to secure them. Why? Because it can be difficult to do it right and the easy options aren't much better than leaving data transmissions in the clear.

That seems an appropriate place to start and so the authors talk about why wireless is so vulnerable, where the problems and risks are and who will attack. There is a lot of technical detail from here on in, which shows how well the authors have grasped the concept and how well they impart details to the reader.

For instance, the book goes into detail about hardware, the chipsets used in various wireless card to what antennae you should use. They even though in a bit of elementary physics for good measure. If that's not enough, the book talks about the various software and drivers available to scan wireless networks (almost all of the ones mentioned are open source).

Of course, the book goes onto how to equip yourself for wardriving and later wireless penetration testing. The basis of these is scanning and mapping and the software/hardware used to mount attacks on networks. Once you know how attacks can be made, the better the defence of the network can be made.

This is a book for people who love technical detail. But thankfully one written in straightforward prose. A chunky book for network administrators kept awake at nights worrying about the safety of wireless installations, the help should assist a better night's sleep.

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