Review: DeXa.Badge/Smart Login

By on

The Schlumberger DeXa.Badge is not so much a single product, more of a secure identity philosophy. Potential use of the associated chip cards could range from simple intranet/internet secure login, to a full blown certificate-based enterprise deployment for local and remote access, physical access control and other related applications.

The Schlumberger DeXa.Badge is not so much a single product, more of a secure identity philosophy. Potential use of the associated chip cards could range from simple intranet/internet secure login, to a full blown certificate-based enterprise deployment for local and remote access, physical access control and other related applications.

For testing purposes I used the reflex USB chip card reader, a compact attractively designed device with a friendly blinking LED to remind you that the card is inserted, on a Windows 2000 SP2 workstation. A supplied software utility called COVE (cryptographic object viewer and editor) enables some fundamental housekeeping via a tabbed interface. Another application, Smart Login, was used as the basis for the tests. The installation routine for this utility and application could have been a little more intuitive, with associated events not necessarily reflecting the guidance offered in the manuals. This is a small point and will not deter the experienced systems administrator, but it would be nice to get it right.

On the plus side, clear ring-bound manuals were supplied, together with supplementary release notes for the supplied software version. Some might prefer a single manual that clearly outlines the available options and how to facilitate them, but the supplied documentation was adequate for the purposes of evaluation.

The concept of the Smart Login is simple enough. The user creates one or more aliases, each of which is associated with a specific user name and password to be used to access a service. These user name and password pairs are stored on the chip card accordingly. Smart Login may then be configured to automatically login to the service, to automatically fill in the user name and password in the service login dialog, or revert to a manual drag and drop method of completing the login information.

When used in this way, a Smart Login list of aliases may be accessed with a right click from the task bar. We set up an alias to access a technical forum on the internet in order to test this functionality, and all went well, with the system behaving exactly as expected. However, from an enterprise perspective, you may have rather more sophisticated requirements. As an established and respected organization in this field, Schlumberger should be well placed to advise on appropriate solutions.

For:

Comprehensive capabilities and configuration.


Against:

Documentation could be usefully revised.


Verdict:

A versatile product using proven technology from an established supplier.

Tags:

Most Read Articles

Log In

Username:
Password:
|  Forgot your password?