What does Heartbleed say about the craft of software?

By on
What does Heartbleed say about the craft of software?

[Blog post] We're clearly getting it wrong.

For the second time in as many months, a grave bug has emerged in core Internet security software.

In February it was the "Goto Fail" bug in the Apple operating system iOS that left web site security inoperable; now we have "Heartbleed", a flaw that leaves many secure web servers in fact open to attackers sniffing memory contents looking for passwords and keys.

There is no shortage of advice on what to do if you're a user. And it's clear how to remediate the Heartbleed bug if you're a web administrator (a fix has been released). But what is the software fraternity going to do to reduce the incidence of these disastrous human errors?

Heartbleed for me is the last straw. I call it pathetic that mission critical code can harbour flaws like this. So for a start, in the interests of clarity, I will no longer use the term "Software Engineering". I've written a lot in the past about the practice and the nascent profession of programming but it seems we're just going backwards. I'm aware that calling programming a "craft" will annoy some people; honestly, I mean no offence to basket weavers.

I'm no merchant of doom. I'm not going to stop banking and shopping online (however I do refuse Internet facing Electronic Health Records, and I would not use a self-drive car). My focus is on software development processes and system security.

The modern world is increasingly dependent on software, so it passes understanding we still tolerate such ad hoc development processes.

The programmer responsible for the Heartbleed bug has explained that he made a number of changes to the code and that he "missed validating a variable" (that variable is the length of the Heartbeat payload which thanks to the bug goes unchecked, leading to an type of overflow error). The designated reviewer of the OpenSSL changes also missed that the length was not validated. The software was released into the wild in March 2012. It went unnoticed (well, unreported) until a few weeks ago and was rectified in an OpenSSL release on April 7.

I'd like to avoid apportioning individual blame, so I am not interested in the names of the programmer and the reviewer. But we have to ask: when so many application security issues are due to overflow errors, why is it not second nature to watch out for bugs like Heartbleed? How did experienced programmers make such a minstake? Why was this flaw out in the wild for two years before it was spotted? I thought one of the core precepts of Open Source Software was that having many eyes looking over the code means errors will be picked up. But code inspection seems not to be widely practiced anymore. There's not much point having open software if people aren't actually looking!

As an aside, criminal hackers know all about overflow errors and might be more motivated to find them than innocent developers. I fear that the Heartbleed bug could have been noticed very quickly by hackers who pore over new releases looking for exactly this type of exploit, or equally by the NSA which is reported to have known about it from the beginning.

Where does this leave systems integrators and enterprise developers? Have they become accustomed to taking Open Source Software modules and building them in, without a whole lot of regression testing? There's a lot to be said for Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) but no enterprise can take "free" too literally; the total cost of development has to include reasonable specification, verification and testing of the integrated whole.

As discussed in the wake of Goto Fail, we need to urgently and radically lift coding standards.

This post is an adaptation of a longer entry on Steven's official blog.

Tags:
Steve Wilson
Steve Wilson is Vice President and Principal Analyst at Constellation Research, Inc, focusing on digital identity and privacy. His coverage areas includes business research themes in Consumerisation of IT and Next Generation Customer Experience. Topics include identity management strategy, policy and governance, and privacy management.
Read more from this blog: Identity Engineering

Most Read Articles

Log In

Username:
Password:
|  Forgot your password?