Conficker renders gaol CCTV footage tampered evidence

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Unpatched systems, software update, at fault.

View larger image View larger image View larger image

See all pictures here »

Security managers at a gaol had to consider closed circuit television footage tampered evidence after it was discovered the organisation's systems had been infected with the Conficker worm.

The gaol had taken all the usual precautions to safeguard its systems; hosts were isolated, external access was strictly forbidden as well as internet surfing and email, all the usual points of attack for a popular worm like Conficker.

But despite insistence from the gaol's security managers that any potential threats were false positives, Symantec analysts discovered unpatched servers running Windows 2003 — and connected to the gaol's IP-connected CCTV system — had indeed enabled the attack, potentially rendering video evidence as unusable.

"What we found was basically a CCTV system had been infected with a threat, and that had come through a maintenance device, a software update, where a third party was involved in maintaining the CCTV system," said Peter Sparkes, the anti-virus firm's director of managed security services for the Asia Pacific and Japan region.

Sparkes would not share details of the gaol's location or when it was infected.

However, he said the attack was an example of viruses and worms living long after their due date.

The Conficker worm is one such instance, continuing to trickle through the feeds of companies like Symantec four years after it was first discovered, despite numerous mitigation attempts by Microsoft and its effective beheading in late 2009.

"Everyone still thinks that the people perpetrating these threats is the smart guy in the shed," Sparkes said.

"It is quite now very easy to perpetrate these threats; there's toolkits, a lot of these people can be self-taught to create this type of malware. Though it wasn't an inmate in this case, it could possibly have been because the information is all available on how to perpetrate these types of threats."

The gaol was one of 1100 enterprises Symantec manages some level of security for through its MSS division, a unit the company says has rapidly grown since its inception locally ten years ago.

The firm unveiled an expanded operations centre for managed security customers this week in Sydney, one of four it operates around the world at alternate times for 24/7 monitoring.

The Sydney officer hosts 11 staff including analysts, as well as transition and systems managers, tasked with dealing with the billions of log entries and security events the company deals with for its customers.

A spokesman said the expanded facility would enable the Sydney unit to offer "all MSS capabilities" including increased log collection and transition.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


 
 
 
Top Stories
The True Cost of BYOD - 2014 survey
Twelve months on from our first study, is BYOD a better proposition?
 
Photos: Unboxing the Magnus supercomputer
Pawsey's biggest beast slots into place.
 
ANZ looks to life beyond the transaction
If digital disruptors think an online payments startup could rock the big four, they’ve missed the point of why people use banks, says Patrick Maes.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
What is delaying adoption of public cloud in your organisation?







   |   View results
Lock-in concerns
  29%
 
Application integration concerns
  3%
 
Security and compliance concerns
  27%
 
Unreliable network infrastructure
  9%
 
Data sovereignty concerns
  22%
 
Lack of stakeholder support
  3%
 
Protecting on-premise IT jobs
  4%
 
Difficulty transitioning CapEx budget into OpEx
  3%
TOTAL VOTES: 1130

Vote