Clueful outs iOS apps sending unprotected passwords

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Morphs into web app to skirt Apple ban.

Banned privacy watchdog app Clueful has re-emerged on the internet and has discovered iPhone apps that send passwords over WiFi in clear text.

The iPhone version of the app was taken down from Apple’s app store in June after it was initially approved. The Cupertino giant refused to discuss the move and gagged developer BitDefender under a non-disclosure agreement from doing the same.

Clueful would scan installed iOS applications purchased for free from the app store to show users the privacy and security measures and risks the software presented. 

The latest incantation skirts Apple’s ban by serving the application as a web app, meaning it lacks the ability to scan iOS devices for installed apps and integrated touchscreen functions.

"It cannot see any of the apps on iPhone, but users can search them on the web, Bitdefender's head of online threats Catalin Cosoi said.

He said he hoped Apple would lift the ban within months, and said only that Cupertino did not ask for Clueful to be redesigned, leaving open questions that the app may have violated Apple's app policies.

Apple's local spokeswoman did not return a request for comment.

While Clueful was no longer an iPhone app, it has been resigned to detect new security gaffes, including whether apps fail to encrypt login credentials or encrypt the data using the defunct MD5 hash.  This would expose the data to interception when it was sent over unprotected wireless networks.

BitDefender’s Clueful team dug up three such apps for SC including Opera (operatory) Pager, a paid subscription app designed for sending messages between PCs, Mac and iOS devices in hospitals and general practitioner clinics.

Two further apps, Virtuoso and Chinese Writer also sent passwords in clear text or hashed with MD5.

A further cursory search on Clueful by SC found the official Qantas Frequent Flyer app exposed usernames in the same way. Online banking and popular e-commerce apps appeared to encrypt user data, though many tapped into location, contacts and social media such as Twitter.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


Clueful outs iOS apps sending unprotected passwords
 
 
 
Top Stories
Myer CIO named retailer's new chief executive
Richard Umbers to lead data-driven retail strategy.
 
Empty terminals and mountains of data
Qantas CIO Luc Hennekens says no-one is safe from digital disruption.
 
BoQ takes $10m hit on Salesforce CRM
Regulatory hurdles end cloud pilot.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest articles on BIT Latest Articles from BIT
Microsoft is offering Azure for Disaster Recovery to Australian SMBs
Feb 10, 2015
If you haven't talked to your IT provider about disaster recovery, it might be worth discussing ...
The 2015 Xero Roadshow is on: here are the locations and dates
Feb 6, 2015
The 2015 Xero Roadshow kicked off this week - see where you can attend at locations around ...
Microsoft Outlook is now on iPhone and iPad: why could this be useful?
Jan 30, 2015
Microsoft today released Office for Android and Outlook for iOS - complementing the other Office ...
Franchisees, here's something you should know about
Jan 23, 2015
You need to know the Code if you are a franchisee or franchisor as the penalties are significant.
Xero users rejoice! Quoting has finally arrived
Jan 23, 2015
It has taken years, but Xero has at last added integrated quoting to its online accounting software.
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  35%
 
Your insurance company
  5%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  9%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  8%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  4%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  18%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  15%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  7%
TOTAL VOTES: 4140

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?

   |   View results
I support shutting down the OAIC.
  26%
 
I DON'T support shutting the OAIC.
  74%
TOTAL VOTES: 1412

Vote