Anonymous attacks UK, Russian Govt sites over Assange, Pussy Riot

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Hacktivists make DDoS attacks, defacements.

The hacktivist group Anonymous is taking credit for a series of attacks that took down the websites of the UK's Ministry of Justice and Home Office.

A popular Anonymous Twitter account said the attacks were launched out of solidarity with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who was granted asylum in Ecuador, but remains at the country's London embassy because police there have threatened to charge him with violating his bail conditions.

Assange has not been charged with any crime, but is wanted for questioning in Sweden related to sexual offense allegations. He has said he will answer any questions from Swedish authorities if he is promised not to be extradited to the US, where he fears prosecution related to his whistleblower site.

The targeted websites -- which lead UK Government affairs pertaining to security, customs and immigration -- are back operating.

Meanwhile, on Tuesday, hackers defaced the website for the Russian court where last week three members of punk rock band Pussy Riot were sentenced to two years in prison. The band led an anti-Putin protest in February at a Moscow cathedral, and were charged with "hooliganism."

The attackers defaced the site to include a song by the band, called "Putin is Lighting the Fires of the Revolution," and a Bulgarian singer's video was posted. The pranksters left a message saying they are affiliated with the “American group Anonymous.”

The website for the Khamovnichesky District Court was temporarily down for maintenance to repair the defacement, and now appears to be operating normally.

Arbor Networks senior product marketing manager Jonathan Lewis said websites should make sure they've developed a tested plan to handle DDoS attacks.

This article originally appeared at scmagazineus.com

Copyright © SC Magazine, US edition


 
 
 
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