[confirmed] 21,485 clear text passwords stolen from Billabong

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Clear text passwords published online.

More than 21,000 clear text passwords have been stolen from Australian surfwear icon Billabong and published online.

The breach has yet to be confirmed. SC has notified the company’s IT desk and provided a link to the codepaste site where the details were uploaded.

Billabong was previously unaware of the breach.

Hacktivists released the credentials under #WikiBoatWednesday, an event popular in hacktivist Twitter circles where groups publish stolen data caches online.

Other administrator database tables and information was released, including hashed passwords.

Here's what Billabong told SC.

"At this stage, we understand that the customer database contains personal information of certain customers of the website, but no financial data.  We view this attack as an extremely serious matter and have taken urgent action to contain the incident and prevent further attacks occurring. We are continuing to gather information about the incident and to establish the extent and nature of the data that may have been accessed.  We will take further appropriate measures as new information comes to light".

The leak comes a day after news broke that some 450,000 Yahoo! Voice email addresses and clear text passwords were uploaded to the internet.

Yahoo! told SC only five per cent of the records were legitimate. 

Updated 5:20PM.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


[confirmed] 21,485 clear text passwords stolen from Billabong
 
 
 
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