50,000 sites compromised in sustained attack

Powered by SC Magazine
 

WordPress, other plugins targeted.

Some 50,000 websites have been compromised as part of a sustained iframe injection attack campaign targeting vulnerable plug-ins for web servers and content management systems.

Attackers targeted holes in a string of plug-ins for blogging software — such as WordPress— including timthumb, uploadify and phpmyadmin.

When one was discovered, attackers would inject a malicious file and an iframe to link the compromised sites. Various browser-based attacks, including drive-by downloads, were also added.

At least 4000 new websites were infected each day, Sucuri malware researcher Daniel Cid told SC.

“So we believe that there are more than 50,000 sites compromised as part of this botnet,” Cid said.

“When all is said and done, you have a large network of compromised sites, all linking to each other and all with the same malware.”

He said a further 5000 were compromised today using the below malicious iframe.

 

 

Many of the queries probed for web hosting software Plesk, a finding backed by the Sans Internet Storms Centre that noted a sharp uptick in requests over port 8443, used by Plesk.

Vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins have been long understood. Last year, large malware campaigns including the LizaMoon attacks exploited those holes, while in November thousands of WordPress sites were hijacked through vulnerable instances of the TimThumb image resizer tool.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


50,000 sites compromised in sustained attack
 
 
 
Top Stories
Beyond ACORN: Cracking the infosec skills nut
[Blog post] Could the Government's cybercrime focus be a catalyst for change?
 
The iTnews Benchmark Awards
Meet the best of the best.
 
Telstra hands over copper, HFC in new $11bn NBN deal
Value of 2011 deal remains intact.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  39%
 
Your insurance company
  3%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  8%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  7%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  2%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  20%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  14%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  6%
TOTAL VOTES: 1780

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?