10,000 Twitter passwords leaked

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Twitter says it wasn't hacked.

Usernames and passwords of Twitter members using file-sharing application TweetGif have been leaked to the internet by a hacking group.

“LulzSec Reborn” spilled around 10,000 personal details of TweetGif users - including real names and locations.

TweetGif allows users to share and post animated gif images, using their Twitter log in. 

The group posted the details to Pastebin directing users to download the .SQL file containing the user data. 

But a spokesperson for Twitter said TweetGif’s use of authorisation protocol OAuth safeguarded its user's passwords. 

"We can confirm that all Twitter account passwords have remained secure, and no breach of our systems has occurred in connection with the events experienced by TweetGif. Regarding how TweetGif  was compromised, we can't speak on their behalf,” in said in a statement to the Huffington Post

The so-called LulzSec Reborn first appeared in March claiming to be a reformed version of the disbanded LulzSec collective - a group which fell apart after the FBI arrested core members.

It previously targeted military dating site MilitarySingles.com, dumping what it claimed to be the email details of 171,000 members of the US military.

Copyright © CRN Australia. All rights reserved.


10,000 Twitter passwords leaked
 
 
 
Top Stories
Beyond ACORN: Cracking the infosec skills nut
[Blog post] Could the Government's cybercrime focus be a catalyst for change?
 
The iTnews Benchmark Awards
Meet the best of the best.
 
Telstra hands over copper, HFC in new $11bn NBN deal
Value of 2011 deal remains intact.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  39%
 
Your insurance company
  3%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  8%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  7%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  2%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  20%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  14%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  6%
TOTAL VOTES: 1801

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?