6.5 million unsalted LinkedIn passwords posted online

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Passwords easy to crack.

Up to 300,000 LinkedIn user passwords may have been cracked after a hash containing some 6.5 million passwords was posted to a hacker forum.

Engineering directorVicente Silveira said in a blog post that compromised accounts have had passwords reset. 

The compromised passwords were stolen before Linkedin had a chance to implement stronger security measures, including salting.

The passwords were encrypted with the SHA-1 hash function and were unsalted and therefore easier to crack with rainbow tables.

About half of the passwords were cracked as of 7am AEST, according to US Security consultancy and crypto boffins KoreLogic who said in a tweet that 3,427,202 passwords were cracked.

The team warned prior to news breaking of the leak that "something big was brewing" and for users to change passwords on major sites.

 

 

News broke after a user 'dwdm' dumped a reported 6,458,020 encrypted LinkedIn passwords on crypto forum insidepro.

Affected users can check if they may be affected by running thier passwords on website LeakedIn, but are advised that a positive hit may mean their password was in use by other users.

Linked has more than 161 million members.

Someone on a Russian forum dumped what is believed to be 6,458,020 encrypted LinkedIn passwords online, than 150 million members

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


6.5 million unsalted LinkedIn passwords posted online
 
 
 
Top Stories
Beyond ACORN: Cracking the infosec skills nut
[Blog post] Could the Government's cybercrime focus be a catalyst for change?
 
The iTnews Benchmark Awards
Meet the best of the best.
 
Telstra hands over copper, HFC in new $11bn NBN deal
Value of 2011 deal remains intact.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  39%
 
Your insurance company
  3%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  8%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  7%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  2%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  20%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  14%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  6%
TOTAL VOTES: 1791

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?