15,400 Aussie credit cards saved in police sting

Powered by SC Magazine
 

AFP save $3.75 million in fraud by spying on carder websites.

More than 15,000 Australian credit cards equating to some $3.75 million were salvaged from underground hacker forums under a global police sting.

The cards were held across 36 carding websites which used automated vending carts to sell the accounts in large batches.

Law enforcement agencies including the Australia Federal Police, the FBI, and the Netherlands national police force investigated the sites and on Wednesday they pounced.

Two men were arrested on suspicion of making large-scale purchases of compromised data from the carding sites, while British anti-fraud police seized computers suspected of being involved in the fraud racket. An operator of an automated vending cart was arrested in Macedonia.

The British serious organised crime unit (SOCA) claimed to have saved some $800 million through its anti-fraud efforts.

It said some two million pieces of financial and personal information have been seized by SOCA.

Details on the 15,450 compromised Australian cards found by the AFP since October last year were supplied to local banks.

The targeted carding websites now display a message from the US informing readers that the domain was seized.

One of the siezed sites. 

“This operation is an excellent example of the level of international cooperation being focused on tackling online fraud,” SOCA head of cyber operations Lee Miles said.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


15,400 Aussie credit cards saved in police sting
 
 
 
Top Stories
Matching databases to Linux distros
Reviewed: OS-repository DBMSs, MariaDB vs MySQL.
 
Coalition's NBN cost-benefit study finds in favour of MTM
FTTP costs too much, would take too long.
 
Who'd have picked a BlackBerry for the Internet of Things?
[Blog] BlackBerry has a more secure future in the physical world.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest Comments
Polls
Which is the most prevalent cyber attack method your organisation faces?




   |   View results
Phishing and social engineering
  71%
 
Advanced persistent threats
  2%
 
Unpatched or unsupported software vulnerabilities
  11%
 
Denial of service attacks
  6%
 
Insider threats
  10%
TOTAL VOTES: 733

Vote