40,000 credit cards stolen after porn sites popped

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Hackers target porn mega websites.

Hackers claim to have stolen 40,000 plain text credit card from porn website Digital Playground.

The lifted details included names, CCV numbers and expiration dates.

Hackers from the group the Consortium say they also looted the personal information on 72,000 users.

 

They said they rooted four of the site's servers which gave access to corporate emails.

"We did not set out to destroy them, but they made it too enticing to resist," the hackers wrote on a defacement [mirror]. "So now our humble crew leaves lulz and mayhem in our path."

"This company has security, that if we didn't know it was a real business, we would have thought to be a joke - a joke that we found much more amusing than they will."

The site's home page remains live, but a note tells members that access is currently unavailable.

Digital Playground is a large adult website owned by Luxembourg-based Manwin. This is the second Manwin property to be hit in recent weeks.

In late February, the chat service of the popular YouPorn site was compromised to expose thousands of usernames and email addresses. A spokeswoman blamed a faulty third-party provider, according to reports.

This article originally appeared at scmagazineus.com

Copyright © SC Magazine, US edition


40,000 credit cards stolen after porn sites popped
 
 
 
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