Innocent: Microsoft drops botnet suit

Powered by SC Magazine
 

Asks former defendant for help.

Microsoft has dismissed a lawsuit against a Czech Republic man and his company in relation to their alleged involvement in controlling a recently dismantled botnet.

The software giant initially contended that Dominique Piatti and his domain name company, dotFREE Group SRO, controlled the Kelihos botnet, according to a complaint filed in mid-September.

This was the first time Microsoft had named a defendant in one of its civil cases involving a botnet.

But after reviewing evidence, Microsoft determined that neither Piatti or his business were responsible for controlling the subdomains that were used to host the former 41,000-node botnet, which was once capable of sending 3.8 billion spam emails per day.

In exchange for dismissing the complaint, Piatti agreed to "delete or transfer" any subdomains that were connected to Kelihos.

"Additionally, Mr. Piatti and dotFREE Group have agreed to work with us to create and implement best practices to prevent abuse of free subdomains and, ultimately, apply these same best practices to establish a secure, free top-level domain as they expand their business going forward," Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit senior attorney Richard Boscovich said.

"Mr. Piatti and dotFree Group will continue to work with Microsoft to become a role model for the free domain industry, establishing industry best practices in the subdomain space."

Attackers increasingly have exploited free subdomain services, particularly for phishing, according to the Anti-Phishing Working Group.

The group found that phishing hosted on subdomains -- which are accounts hosted beneath a domain owned by a provider -- nearly doubled in the second half of 2010, with China and Korea seeing the most pronounced jumps. 

"Use of subdomain services continues to be a challenge, because only the subdomain providers themselves can effectively mitigate these phish," it said.

"While many of these services are responsive to complaints, very few take proactive measures to keep criminals from abusing their services in the first place."

Meanwhile, Boscovich said Microsoft still intends to pursue action against 22 "John Does" named as co-defendants in the original lawsuit. They are believed to be the ones who were actually in charge of the botnet.

This article originally appeared at scmagazineus.com

Copyright © SC Magazine, US edition


Innocent: Microsoft drops botnet suit
 
 
 
Top Stories
Myer CIO named retailer's new chief executive
Richard Umbers to lead data-driven retail strategy.
 
Empty terminals and mountains of data
Qantas CIO Luc Hennekens says no-one is safe from digital disruption.
 
BoQ takes $10m hit on Salesforce CRM
Regulatory hurdles end cloud pilot.
 
 
Sign up to receive iTnews email bulletins
   FOLLOW US...
Latest articles on BIT Latest Articles from BIT
Microsoft is offering Azure for Disaster Recovery to Australian SMBs
Feb 10, 2015
If you haven't talked to your IT provider about disaster recovery, it might be worth discussing ...
The 2015 Xero Roadshow is on: here are the locations and dates
Feb 6, 2015
The 2015 Xero Roadshow kicked off this week - see where you can attend at locations around ...
Microsoft Outlook is now on iPhone and iPad: why could this be useful?
Jan 30, 2015
Microsoft today released Office for Android and Outlook for iOS - complementing the other Office ...
Franchisees, here's something you should know about
Jan 23, 2015
You need to know the Code if you are a franchisee or franchisor as the penalties are significant.
Xero users rejoice! Quoting has finally arrived
Jan 23, 2015
It has taken years, but Xero has at last added integrated quoting to its online accounting software.
Latest Comments
Polls
Who do you trust most to protect your private data?







   |   View results
Your bank
  35%
 
Your insurance company
  5%
 
A technology company (Google, Facebook et al)
  9%
 
Your telco, ISP or utility
  8%
 
A retailer (Coles, Woolworths et al)
  4%
 
A Federal Government agency (ATO, Centrelink etc)
  18%
 
An Australian law enforcement agency (AFP, ASIO et al)
  15%
 
A State Government agency (Health dept, etc)
  7%
TOTAL VOTES: 4095

Vote
Do you support the abolition of the Office of the Information Commissioner?

   |   View results
I support shutting down the OAIC.
  26%
 
I DON'T support shutting the OAIC.
  74%
TOTAL VOTES: 1396

Vote