Lulzsec's Recursion arrested

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Alleged hacker accused of cracking Sony.

Another suspected LulzSec member has been arrested in connection with cracking the Sony Pictures Network.

Cody Kretsinger, 23, of Phoneix, was arrested Thursday by the FBI in what has been a slow and ongoing effort to track down members of the Anonymous and LulzSec online groups.

Kretsinger, said to have used the handle Recursion,  was accused of hacking Sony Pictures between 27 May and 2 June and compromising the personal data of millions of users.

He was charged with conspiracy and the unauthorised impairment of a protected computer.

The Huffington Post reported Kretsinger allegedly used a proxy server before lauching a SQL injection attack against Sony Pictures servers.

He was also said to have erased the hard drive of the computer used to conduct the attacks.

The arrest of Kretsinger follows the arrest of accused LulzSec member Ryan Cleary, 19, for his suspected involvement in building a botnet to launch denial of service attacks against the CIA website.

Also, on Thursday the FBI charged Christopher Doyon, 47, of California and Joshua John Covelli, 26, of Ohio for launching denial of service attacks against Santa Cruz County in December.

Doyon and Covelli were charged with conspiracy to cause intentional damage to a protected computer, causing intentional damage to a protected computer, and aiding and abetting. They face 15 years in prison.

Copyright © SC Magazine, Australia


Lulzsec's Recursion arrested
 
 
 
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